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Curing Their Ills Colonial Power and African Illness by Megan Vaughan

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Published by Stanford University Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Medical Geography,
  • History - General History,
  • Sociology Of Medicine,
  • History: World,
  • Medicine,
  • General,
  • Africa,
  • 19th century,
  • 20th century,
  • Colonies,
  • History

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages224
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7928762M
ISBN 100804719705
ISBN 109780804719704

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  Curing their Ills traces the history of encounters between European medicine and African societies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Vaughan's detailed examination of medical discourse of the period reveals its shifting and fragmented nature, highlights its use in the creation of the colonial subject in Africa, and explores the conflict between its pretensions to scientific neutrality and Pages:   Curing Their Ills: Colonial Power and African Illness. This is a lively and original book, which treats Western biomedical discourse about illness in Africa as a cultural system that constructed "the African" out of widely varying, and sometimes improbable, materials/5. Curing their Ills traces the history of encounters between European medicine and African societies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Vaughan's detailed examination of medical discourse of the period reveals its shifting and fragmented nature, highlights its use in the creation of the colonial subject in Africa, and explores the conflict between its pretensions to scien.   Curing Their Ills Colonial Power and African Illness This is a lively and original book which treats Western biomedical discourse about illness in Africa as a cultural system that constructed the African out of widely varying and sometimes improbable. Curing Their Ills: /5().

Curing Their Ills brings refreshing concreteness and dynamism to the discussion of European attitudes toward their others, as it traces the shifts and variations in medical discourse on African illness. Curing their Ills Colonial Power and African Illness Megan Vaughan Stanford University Press Stanford, California Contents List of Illustrations viii Preface ix 1 Introduction: Discourse, Subjectivity and Differences 1 2 Rats' Tails and Trypanosomes: Nature and Culture inFile Size: 26KB.   Medical Book Curing Their Ills Vaughan's detailed examination of medical discourse of the period reveals its shifting and fragmented nature, highlights its use in the creation of the colonial subject in Africa, and explores the conflict between its pretensions to scientific neutrality and its political and cultural motivations. Curing Their Ills brings refreshing concreteness and dynamism to the discussion of European attitudes toward their others, as it traces the shifts and variations in medical discourse on African 4/5(1).

Curing their Ills traces the history of encounters between European medicine and African societies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Curing their Ills traces the history of encounters between European medicine and African societies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Vaughan's detailed examination of medical discourse of the period reveals its shifting and fragmented nature, highlights its use in the creation of the colonial subject in Africa, and explores the conflict between its pretensions to scientific neutrality and its political and . Description of the book "Curing their Ills": Curing their Ills traces the history of encounters between European medicine and African societies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In Curing their Ills, Cambridge anthropologist Megan Vaughan examines the difficulties faced by African colonizers as they tried to find the best frame of reference from which to approach African medical problems. Colonizers struggled in their own debates to determine whether to perceive Africa and Africans in terms of difference as well as whether to attribute behaviors and outcomes to African culture or .